Why are you Here?

Why are you here?  What are you here for?  Many of you think you know, but do you really.  Masonry is not a social club although we do act individually within our community and hopefully apply the principles that we learned in Masonry to initiate that interaction.  We are not a charity but as a Fraternity and as a Lodge we do much philanthropy.  You must also question your motives as to why you joined Masonry.  To find the answers to these questions, these dilemmas, we first must know what Freemasonry is.  Freemasonry is a lifelong study of self-realization, self-improvement,(...)

The Master’s Hat

Why does the Master wear a hat?

How many times do newly raised brethren ask the question, and how few of the brethren interrogated can give a satisfactory answer! Usually the reply is: Oh, that an old symbol, or: Thats one of the Landmarks.: But, as a matter of fact, wearing a hat in Lodge is symbolic only as all custom with regard to headgear are symbolic, and certainly no custom which has suffered so many changes and reversals as this, can, by any stretch of a point, be considered a Landmark. Ceremonies connected with clothing are very ancient, dating at(...)

Ellis Island – The Golden Door

ELLIS ISLAND

It is not a name that one normally associates with the Ancient and Accepted Order of Freemasons.  Yet in the last few months, after repeated visits to the island, I have come to see this historic immigration facility as one of the most Masonic structures on the planet.It is not a feeling that can be easily explained.  Free Masonry after all, was a respected institution in America long before Ellis was built-long before this country even was a country (The Free Masons have been in existence for longer than many of the world’s nations for that matter).  And(...)

Where Parallel Lines Intersect

"But in modern times they are dedicated to St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist, who were eminent patrons of Masonry; and since their time there is represented in every regular and well governed Lodge a certain Point within a circle; the Point representing an individual Brother; the Circle representing the boundary which he is never to suffer his passions, prejudices or interests, to betray him on any occasion.  This Circle is embroidered by two perpendicular parallel lines, representing St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist, who are perfect parallels in Christianity as well as Masonry. (...)

Amos What Seest Thou?

In all the Lodges under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of the State of Louisiana (and many other Grand Jurisdictions) the Volume of the Sacred Law should be open at the Seventh Chapter of Amos in the Fellowcraft Degree. Why do we do this? This practice is not universal, but ours has the sanctity of long use and the sacredness of the familiar. Also, since one of the working tools of a Fellowcraft Mason is the Plumb, it is appropriate to open the Bible at the story about the plumb line of the Lord.   What do we really know about(...)